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Sep152013

Guidelines: Email Etiquette - Attachments 

The average corporate desktop computer is a low end machine that has little processing power, a small amount of allocated disk space and a shortage of RAM. Because of this, it does not take much to crash one of these systems.

Opening a large file or a file with an unexpected extension can result in the computer crashing, and consequentially the loss of expensive man hours

By following some simple email attachment guidelines, you can minimize a user's downtime and protect their computers from unexpected crashes.

Limitations and Protections

Corporations manage thousands of users and need to protect the stability of hundreds of servers. To protect these systems, companies limit the amount of available disk space and restrict an average user's privileges. Therefore, this stops users from installing unauthorized applications or opening certain extensions.

Limitations are in place to protect the integrity of your computer and the network as a whole.

Attachment Guidelines

Follow these guidelines before sending any email attachments:

Draft Files - If you are sending files that require a series of approvals from a customer or manager, then send them small low resolution copies for review.

Compressing Files - Most media production and office applications (Video, Audio, and Office Files) allow a user to reduce a file size by removing background pictures and other formatting options.

Devices - Make sure you know what device a recipient will use to view the file. This allows you to tailor the size and resolution of a file to a particular device.

Graphic Formats - Avoid Bitmap, PNG, and RAW formatted files, as they take a lot of RAM to decode.

Cropping Pictures - Anytime you use an asset in a document (photos, video or audio), the production application usually embeds the asset in the document. Before emailing it, reduce the size of the file by replacing any full resolution or un-cropped assets with a compressed and cropped version.

Video - Avoid any high resolution formats, as lower end systems are not capable of running the video.

Extensions and different file types

Before sending an unexpected attachment, you might want to send a preliminary email asking if it is ok to send a file. Detail the size, type and reason for sending the file.

Moreover, trying to open bizarre extensions can crash computers, and increase the chance that the file will never get to its intended receiver.

To avoid this type of damage, preface your email with a caution about the file extension and then explain what steps they need to take to open the file.

Attachment Alternatives

Depending on the size and confidentiality of the file you are sending, you might want to use an online storage option.

These storage services include Microsoft Skydrive and Google Documents, and file syncing services Live Mesh and Dropbox.

Benefits of online storage

·        Multiple users can access and modify a single file while collaborating on a project.

·        The latest file version is always available for viewing

·        Some services allow stored files to be 2 gigs and higher.

·        The file, and the corresponding program, can be stored and downloaded from the same location.

In conclusion, people are inundated with email attachments that can take up a user's limited allotment of hard drive space and destabilize their computer. 

Therefore, before sending an email attachment, try to follow the simple guidelines we outlined in this article, and protect a recipient's computer and ultimately your reputation.

 

The average corporate desktop computer is a low end machine that has little processing power, a small amount of allocated disk space and a shortage of RAM. Because of this, it does not take much to crash one of these systems.

Opening a large file or a file with an unexpected extension can result in the computer crashing, and consequentially the loss of expensive man hours

By following some simple email attachment guidelines, you can minimize a user's downtime and protect their computers from unexpected crashes.

Limitations and Protections

Corporations manage thousands of users and need to protect the stability of hundreds of servers. To protect these systems, companies limit the amount of available disk space and restrict an average user's privileges. Therefore, this stops users from installing unauthorized applications or opening certain extensions.

Limitations are in place to protect the integrity of your computer and the network as a whole.

Attachment Guidelines

Follow these guidelines before sending any email attachments:

Draft Files - If you are sending files that require a series of approvals from a customer or manager, then send them small low resolution copies for review.

Compressing Files - Most media production and office applications (Video, Audio, and Office Files) allow a user to reduce a file size by removing background pictures and other formatting options.

Devices - Make sure you know what device a recipient will use to view the file. This allows you to tailor the size and resolution of a file to a particular device.

Graphic Formats - Avoid Bitmap, PNG, and RAW formatted files, as they take a lot of RAM to decode.

Cropping Pictures - Anytime you use an asset in a document (photos, video or audio), the production application usually embeds the asset in the document. Before emailing it, reduce the size of the file by replacing any full resolution or un-cropped assets with a compressed and cropped version.

Video - Avoid any high resolution formats, as lower end systems are not capable of running the video.

Extensions and different file types

Before sending an unexpected attachment, you might want to send a preliminary email asking if it is ok to send a file. Detail the size, type and reason for sending the file.

Moreover, trying to open bizarre extensions can crash computers, and increase the chance that the file will never get to its intended receiver.

To avoid this type of damage, preface your email with a caution about the file extension and then explain what steps they need to take to open the file.

Attachment Alternatives

Depending on the size and confidentiality of the file you are sending, you might want to use an online storage option.

These storage services include Microsoft Skydrive and Google Documents, and file syncing services Live Mesh and Dropbox.

Benefits of online storage

·        Multiple users can access and modify a single file while collaborating on a project.

·        The latest file version is always available for viewing

·        Some services allow stored files to be 2 gigs and higher.

·        The file, and the corresponding program, can be stored and downloaded from the same location.

In conclusion, people are inundated with email attachments that can take up a user's limited allotment of hard drive space and destabilize their computer. 

Therefore, before sending an email attachment, try to follow the simple guidelines we outlined in this article, and protect a recipient's computer and ultimately your reputation.

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